Author Archive | Steve Miller

Thinking Statistical Bias

Two Septembers ago, families of students at our suburban Chicago high school received an email from the principal detailing school performance over the previous 12 months. His note chronicled the considerable accomplishments of individual students, student organizations and school athletics. He also made special mention of the school’s large number of new semi-finalists from the […]

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Data Vu All Over Again

I’m very excited about some of the work my company OpenBI, a BI consultancy focused on open source (OS) solutions, is currently doing. Over the last month or so, we’ve been collaborating with OS analytics database leader Infobright and OS BI platform vendor Jaspersoft — with “special sauce” from the freely-available R Project for Statistical […]

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Musings on the 2011 U.S. News Best Colleges

It’s back to school time, so, like every year, I rush out to drop $10 on the latest U.S. News compendium of Best Colleges. And, like every year, I’m immediately annoyed at what I read. Yet I tolerate this frustration, actually finding the ratings an inciteful illustration of performance measurement useful for BI. After more […]

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Don’t Stop With Your First Draft

A few weeks ago, I started an analytics engagement with a manufacturing company. Their interest was in developing dashboards that would show the results of product reliability models both individually and by various groupings. OpenBI loves working at the intersection of BI and analytics, so dashboards of “Weibull” coefficients are right up our alley. Another […]

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Bias in BI

A few weeks ago, I wrote on the U.S News Best Colleges, 2011. One of my observations was that the rankings seemed to favor small, highly-selective and well-endowed private schools over larger public state universities. Indeed for 2011, no state school cracked the top 20 national universities, and only two, Berkeley and UCLA, made the […]

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The Science of Business Manifesto – Part 2

In Part 1 of The Science of Business Manifesto, I discussed at a high level using the long-established scientific method of observe, hypothesize, predict and test as a foundation for performance management and BI.  In Part 2, I delve into into a bit more detail, paying special attention to the transition from business to science […]

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The Science of Business Manifesto – Part 1

To my Bias in BI article a few weeks back, several commentors responded, questioning the relevance of  the discussion for business intelligence. Though it was clear to me, I realized I hadn’t done an adequate job prepping readers for my thoughts on the “science of business” that were behind the writing. I hope in  the […]

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Misconceptions About Statistics – Part 2

When I was a grad student many years ago, I subsidized my studies doing part-time statistical and programming consulting at the university. I’d generally be presented with data on magnetic tape to read, organize and analyze by a research group conducting research. At that time, my “platform” was Fortran, PL/I and SAS on an IBM […]

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Outer Banks Vacation Reading – The Invisible Gorilla

It only seems natural for me to read a book on how intuitions deceive us while vacationing in the Outer Banks. Home from OBX for over two weeks now, my partners swear I’m deceiving myself that I’m still in Nags Head enjoying surf, tuna and crabs. Back to work, they urge. The Invisible Gorilla, And […]

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Growing Pains for SAS

Statistical juggernaut SAS is experiencing growing pains, even as it approaches middle age. In a decision that that could have major  impact on the analytics marketplace, the UK High Court has ruled against SAS in its litigation of tiny UK upstart World Programming Ltd (WPL).WPL introduced its WPS SAS interpreter clone several years ago, offering […]

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